Paths in Progress Podcast Gets “Broadway” Spotlight

 The podcast, Paths in Progress, hosted by Carrie Young, is now on the streaming site, Broadway on Demand, which launched its podcasts offerings in May.

Paths in Progress was selected as one of BOD’s featured podcasts because of its focus on education and a spotlight with some guests in the performing arts. Young, who started the podcast in 2021, is no stranger to the arts herself. She spent a decade on stage with the Houston Grand Opera Chorus while working as an academic advisor and is ecstatic to have a new audience.

“I’m so thrilled that Paths in Progress will have a new platform for professionals to have their stories heard,” said Young. “Your degree doesn’t always define your career path and I want those listening to know that their strengths and education can take them in directions they’ve never imagined.”

Paths in Progress can be downloaded in the Apple Store, Spotify, Google Podcasts with select episodes now on Broadway on Demand.

All media inquiries can be sent to Pathsinprogresspodcast@gmail.com.

Carrie Young started the podcast, Paths in Progress in late 2021. In just six months, the podcast has 30 episodes – all of them individuals sharing stories about their journey from college to the directions their professional lives have taken them. It is geared towards college students, educators and the professionals who work with them.

Paths in Progress

Carrie Young

719-205-3207

https://pathsinprogress.buzzsprout.com/

ContactContact

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  • Performing Arts

Progress of Revamped Distribution Sector Scheme


The Ministry of Power, Government of India, had launched the Reforms-based and Results-linked, Revamped Distribution Sector Scheme (RDSS), with the objective to improve the operational efficiencies and financial sustainability of State owned DISCOMs/ Power Departments by providing financial assistance to DISCOMs for modernisation and strengthening of distribution infrastructure, aiming at improvement of the reliability and quality of supply to end consumers.


State Governments of Meghalaya and Assam have become the frontrunners in planning their operational and financial reforms as well as the underlying works to accomplish the same under Revamped Distribution Sector Scheme (Nodal Agency – REC). Accordingly, their state-level Distribution Reforms Committee (DRC) and State Cabinet have approved the proposals, including Action Plan and DPR, for consideration under the scheme.


The Action Plans from the states include multiple reform measures aimed towards loss reduction, implementation of smart prepaid metering of majority of their consumer base, 100% feeder level energy accounting by FY 23, reconductoring of old / frayed conductors, conversion to LT ABC, bifurcation of feeders, segregation of agriculture feeders, and upgradation of billing and other IT/OT systems, in addition to works towards improving quality and reliability of supply. Under these plans, the State Governments have also committed to ensure financial viability of the Discoms, such as liquidation of outstanding subsidy dues and Govt. department dues, implementation of tariff reforms, measures to enhance consumer services etc. These proposals would now be put forward to the Monitoring Committee set up by the Ministry of Power for approval.


This time, two of the North-Eastern states have shown exemplary initiative in plan formulation for turning around of their power sector.  Also, several other states are also in advanced stages of submission of their proposals under the scheme. 39 out of 55 beneficiary Discoms (Nodal Agencies REC and PFC) have already submitted their draft proposals and are in active discussions with Nodal Agencies for their finalization, while the balance Discoms are also expected to send their proposals shortly.


It is noteworthy that Revamped Distribution Sector Scheme has an outlay of Rs.3,03,758 crore with an estimated budgetary support from Central Government of Rs. 97,631 crores, which would be available till FY 2025-26. The assistance is reforms linked and will be based on meeting pre-qualifying criteria as well as upon achievement of performance benchmarks by DISCOMs evaluated based on an agreed and customised evaluation framework tied to financial and operational improvements. The unique feature of the scheme is that its Implementation is based on the action plan worked out for each state to address state specific issues, rather than a “one-size-fits-all” approach.


Key interventions envisioned under this program include providing support to DISCOMs to undertake activities for ensuring 100% System metering, implementing Prepaid Smart Metering, Energy Accounting, and implementing infrastructure works for Loss Reduction, as well as for Modernization and System Augmentation aimed at improving the quality and reliability of power supply. In addition, segregation of feeders dedicated only for supply of power for agricultural purposes, which are proposed to be solarized under the KUSUM scheme, will be sanctioned on priority under the scheme. Along with their proposals, DISCOMs will also need to submit an Action plan for strengthening their distribution system and improving performance by way of various reform measures targeting improvement in operational efficiency, financial viability and quality and reliability of power supply.


Given the current state of operational and financial losses of Discoms in the country and to provide a much-needed fillip to the power sector as well as the overall economy in the pandemic affected year, multiple meetings and workshops with Discoms have been conducted to assess their level of preparedness for taking benefits under the scheme by the Ministry of Power and the Nodal Agencies, chaired by the Hon’ble Minister of Power, Sh. R. K. Singh.


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Canada – Updates on the progress being made to address sexual misconduct and advance culture change for Canada’s Defence Team

Ottawa – National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces

Today, National Defence launched an online progress tracker that will be used to update members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), employees of the Department of National Defence (DND), and Canadians about our work and our progress in addressing culture and conduct.

Every member of the CAF and DND team deserves to work in an environment of mutual respect, dignity and inclusion, where they have the opportunity to contribute and thrive.

Achieving long-term, sustainable change will take time. Progress is being made on key supporting efforts to achieve this lasting culture change, and DND/CAF are committed to measuring and evaluating progress over the long term. Key to these efforts is accountability and remaining transparent about our progress — both with members of the Defence Team and the Canadian public.

The progress tracker, which will be updated at regular intervals, outlines the work the DND/CAF is undertaking between now and March 31, 2022, and will be expanded over time as additional activities are undertaken and progress made.

Daniel Minden

Press Secretary

Office of the Minister of National Defence

Phone: 613-996-3100

Daniel.Minden@forces.gc.ca

Media Relations

Department of National Defence

Phone: 613-904-3333

Email: mlo-blm@forces.gc.ca

Hong Kong – Progress in handling of banking complaints by HKMA

Progress in handling of banking complaints by HKMA

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The following is issued on behalf of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority:

     The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) announced today (August 13) the progress made in its handling of banking complaints received as at end-July 2021. Banking complaints include cases concerning general banking services and conduct-related issues.
      
     In July 2021, 258 cases were received and the handling of 238 cases was completed. As at end-July, the handling of 752 cases was in progress. 
      
     A table summarising the progress made in the handling of banking complaints by the HKMA is attached.

Progress update on the Government of Canada’s commitment to clean water in First Nations communities

As the Government of Canada works towards ensuring all First Nations communities have reliable access to clean water, it remains committed to lifting all long-term drinking water advisories on First Nations reserves. Access to clean drinking water is essential.

Today, Indigenous Services Canada provided a progress update on this commitment. As of March 10, 2021, 101 long-term drinking water advisories have been lifted. This means that since November 2015, clean water access has been restored to approximately 5,850 homes and 430 community buildings in 73 First Nations communities. While 58 long-term advisories remain in 38 communities, project teams continue their work on each and every one. Information on each community’s progress can be found on new and updated web pages at https://www.canada.ca/water-on-reserve.

Resolving short-term advisories before they become long-term is also an important part of the overall work to eliminate long-term drinking water advisories. Since November 2015, 175 short-term drinking water advisories (advisories lasting between two and 12 months) have been lifted before becoming long-term.

This past year has presented new challenges in meeting this objective. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the health and wellbeing of First Nations community members has been our shared top priority. First Nations have been leading the response to protect their communities from the virus, and in some cases this has had an effect on getting equipment and resources into communities, especially in remote and northern areas.

While we continue our collective efforts to address the ongoing pandemic, together, the Government of Canada and First Nations also remain focused on building long-term solutions to support sustainable access to safe, clean drinking water and restore trust in the water supply.

Since the pandemic began in March 2020, First Nations, with support from Indigenous Services Canada, have lifted 13 long-term drinking water advisories in the past 12 months, improving access to clean water for more than 1000 homes and 65 community buildings including schools, health facilities and band offices. During that same period, 24 short-term drinking water advisories were also lifted, preventing them from becoming long term issues, restoring reliable access to clean drinking water for hundreds more homes on reserves.

The Government of Canada has committed over $3.5 billion in funding to achieving clean drinking water on reserves since 2015. This includes $616.3 million over six years, and $114.1 million per year ongoing thereafter, to provide a stable and predictable source of funding for operations and maintenance costs, ensuring longer lifecycles and more durable systems, and enabling First Nations to better maintain their water and wastewater infrastructure over the long-term.

Progress on lifting long-term drinking water advisories
On March 9th, we celebrated the 100th and 101st lifts in Anishinabe of Wauzhushk Onigum and Xeni Gwet’in First Nations Government.

Additionally, this year, we recognize the achievements realized through close collaboration with the following communities:

On January 23, 2021, Black Lake First Nation (Saskatchewan) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in effect since April 2013. Upgrades and expansion of the water treatment plant have improved access to clean drinking water for over 190 homes and 6 community buildings including the school, fire hall and band office.
On December 23, 2021, Lake Manitoba (Manitoba) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in effect since June 2019. Connection of a new well has resulted in better access to clean drinking water for everyone who uses the Jordan’s Principle Building.
On November 9, 2020, Mishkeegogamang Ojibway Nation (Ontario) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in effect since October 2019. Repairs to the water system and improved operations have enabled improved access to clean drinking water for 75 homes and 6 community buildings.
On September 30, 2020, Anishinabe of Wauzhushk Onigum Nation (Ontario) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in place since January 2017. Over 100 homes and 15 community buildings now have access clean, reliable water through a connection to the City of Kenora’s water system.
On September 30, 2020, Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation (Ontario) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in place since February 2019. Upgrades and repairs to their water system have enable improved access to clean drinking water for 40 homes and 7 community buildings.
On September 30, 2020, Animakee Wa Zhing #37 First Nation (Ontario) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in effect since September 2002. Interim upgrades to the water system has restored access to clean water for 25 homes and 5 community buildings.
On September 25, 2020, Fort Severn First Nation (Ontario) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in effect since February 2019. As a result of repairs to the water distribution system and improvements to water quality monitoring, over 90 homes and 6 community buildings now have better access to clean drinking water.
On September 23, 2020, Grassy Narrows First Nation (Ontario) lifted the last remaining  long-term drinking water advisory that had been in effect since June 2014. Upgrades to the water treatment system have brought clean drinking water to over 200 homes and 16 community buildings.  All residents in the community now have access to clean drinking water.
On September 10, 2020, Kehewin Cree Nation (Alberta) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in place since April 2011. A new water treatment plant and upgrades to water infrastructure have improved access to clean drinking water for over 300 homes homes and 11 community buildings. With this lift, no long-term drinking water advisories are currently in effect on public systems on reserves in Alberta.
On August 28, 2020, Bonaparte (British Columbia) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in place since February 2006. All five homes in the community are connected to a new water treatment plant and have access to clean drinking water.
On July 30, 2020, Wuskwi Sipihk First Nation (Manitoba) lifted a long-term drinking water advisory that had been in effect since April 2014. A new water treatment plant provides clean drinking water to over 40 homes and 7 community buildings.
Between March 1, 2020 and March 3, 2021, eleven long-term drinking water advisories were added and two long-term drinking water advisories were de-activated.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has affected everyone, with Indigenous communities facing even greater challenges. While the pandemic has also impacted construction work and project deadlines, we remain committed to ending all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserves and improving access to safe drinking water. We will not stop until this work is done.”

The Honourable Marc Miller
Minister of Indigenous Services

A drinking water advisory becomes long-term when it has been in place for more than a year. Between November 2015 and March 10, 2021, 101 long-term advisories affecting public systems on reserves were lifted. 58 remain in effect in 38 First Nations.

As of September 30, 2020, more than $1.74 billion of targeted funds has been allocated to support 657 water and wastewater projects in 581 First Nations communities, serving approximately 462,000 people. A total of 365 of these projects are complete.

In December 2020, the Government of Canada announced an additional $1.5 billion to help accelerate the work being done to end all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserves, to better support the operation and maintenance of systems, and to continue program investments in water and wastewater infrastructure. This funding includes $616.3 million over six years, and $114.1 million ongoing, to increase the support provided for operations and maintenance of water and wastewater infrastructure on reserves.

Through the Investing in Canada Plan, the Government of Canada is investing more than $180 billion over 12 years in public transit projects, green infrastructure, social infrastructure, trade and transportation routes, and Canada’s rural and northern communities.