Allen Woo explains how to give a transcendent purpose to your team

Allen Woo is sure that giving a transcendent purpose to your team is an ideal tool for the company’s growth and explains how this can be made possible.

Québec, Canada – WEBWIRE

Commitment cannot be achieved through rewards or punishment but can be inspired only through the belief that giving the best to the project will enhance their lives.



Experts recognize that transcendent motivation often goes unnoticed because it is not usually mentioned. This motivation is not for themselves, but for others. People who live with this motivation as a philosophy live to help others, on a daily basis, dedicating the best of themselves to their responsibilities. Allen Woo, an experienced personnel manager, explains how to give a transcendent purpose to the work team. 


Transcendent motivation is that drive that moves employees to act because of the consequences of their actions for others: it is to serve others. In a normal organization, employees are paid not for doing their job but for playing a role. 


The real job, then, is to help their company win, that is, to achieve its mission profitably and ethically. What happens is that, all too often, each individual and each part of the organization pursues its own interests at the expense of the organization as a whole.


Woo observed that: “people with goals and jobs that depended on achieving them are likely to achieve those goals even if they have to tear the company apart to do so.” Organizations often face a dilemma that seems irresolvable as individual incentives create silos on the one hand and collective incentives can destroy productivity on the other. 


Most focus on the known bad thing: individual performance indicators and accept the consequent impact on collaboration. Woo proposes to solve this problem by using purpose, accepting that the type of leadership needed to engage people in meaningful work is more complicated than it may seem.


The expert defines leadership as the process by which a person (the leader) gains the internal commitment of others (the followers) to achieve a mission that is aligned with the values of the group. “Commitment cannot be achieved through rewards or punishment but can be inspired only through the belief that giving the best to the project will enhance their lives,” Woo adds. 


In an organization, you have to be aware that you are part of a team and that you can’t win if the team doesn’t win, so you have to collaborate with your colleagues. To be an inspirational leader, the first thing to do is to understand that this type of leadership has nothing to do with formal authority but is related to moral authority. Hearts and minds cannot be bought or forced but can only be deserved and earned and therefore only granted to worthwhile missions and deserving leaders.


“As leaders, we should not always want our followers to do what we tell them to do because we cannot know every time what they need to do in every case to help the team win most effectively,” Woo asserts. “And even if we wanted them to obey, we also want them to put in their efforts and expertise to win, for which we want them to act with initiative, intelligence and enthusiasm. These behaviors cannot be forcefully extracted; they must be inspired by love and enthusiasm, so we must make our lives and the lives of the rest of the team meaningful.”


Through transformational leadership and a transcendent purpose, different problems can be addressed more effectively as it relies on the inspirational power of intangible incentives. This can include the individual feeling of collaborating on an important purpose, a sense of achievement and self-esteem, as well as shared values and ethics and a desire to be part of a community.


The transcendent purpose is related to the long term. It is a style that makes employees mobilize over a long horizon, and makes them walk paths to approach life and work from generosity, trust and attitude of service. However, this motivation must be especially driven by the leader. If the leader is not involved in promoting this type of motivation, it is more difficult to carry it out in a team.


About Allen Woo


Allen Woo is a self-taught expert in business and personnel management. Originally from Canada, he has spent much of his adult life honing his innate skills in motivation and personal growth. Woo dedicates his time to helping businesses and individuals make significant improvements in their daily interactions, constantly exploring new methods to motivate and enhance teams. When he’s away from responsibilities, he likes to focus on inner growth and enjoys outdoor activities that exercise the body and the mind.

Allen Woo discusses how to improve business processes and drive growth

Improving business processes to achieve greater growth is a challenge, but Allen Woo how businesses can achieve this goal more efficiently.

Québec, Canada – WEBWIRE



Time is the one thing that business owners do not have enough of. Automation, integration and outsourcing are all great ways to save time. Business improvement expert Allen Woo outlines four steps that will help you to simplify your business processes.


Your business processes are the tasks or actions you and your team take to accomplish your business goals. These can include everyday tasks like communication, expense management, and transaction management.


You’re not the only one who uses Excel for business process management (BPM). These tasks can become a bottleneck and you should consider using tools that allow you to concentrate on other things. Although business process improvement (BPI) may seem like a burden, it doesn’t have the to be.


Woo says, “With a growing or large team, you need tools to work for everyone, anywhere.” Apps such as Slack and Google Chat aren’t just for tech companies. These apps can help you increase productivity within your company. Zoom and Microsoft Teams are both popular options for video conferencing. This is especially true now that more people work remotely.


Before you decide which communication tool to use, it is important to make a list. Customers and contractors could be included as stakeholders. Prioritize the users most likely to use your product, such as your customer service team, sales team, and project management team.


Next, ensure that the application is compatible with all existing email, project or customer relationship management systems. Verifying integrations will help you decide the best configuration for each scenario.


Automation can save time and money. Automation reduces human error. You can make your team more productive and reduce the number of repetitive tasks. Start by doing a process analysis to identify inefficient processes. Take a look at the workflows of different teams and create a flowchart to help you make decisions.


When you implement a new system, you don’t need to reinvent the process. Software should be flexible enough that it can work with you. These benefits go beyond efficiency. Automation can help you make continuous improvements to your business. Your team will be less distracted by details and can focus on bigger projects that directly impact customer satisfaction or your bottom line.


Late invoices, missed invoices, or invoices that you intended to send but forgot to, can all hinder healthy cash flow. Woo explains that the solution is to improve the process.


Perhaps your team member still prepares and sends out batches of invoices each week. Automating everything will allow you to save time and get paid quicker.


Woo explained how to create invoices with a custom-branded logo that offer a “pay now” option. Woo also mentioned that automated reminders can be set up to assist customers in staying on track. He also suggested that fees could be added to encourage timely payments. It is possible to see if customers have seen their bills. If they haven’t seen their bill, verify that the email address you have is correct.


Accounts payable is the other side of cash flow. Woo stated that it is easy to forget to pay bills until you realize you have to collect them.


But managing utilities, rent, and vendor invoices, among others, can be overwhelming if you’re trying to do it all by hand. Managing payments is another business process that is easier to automate.


Integration is automation’s best friend. Life is so much easier when you fully integrate your systems. Like many businesses, you probably use multiple applications or software to manage your operations. Payroll is a great example of a process that can take longer and be less accurate when your systems don’t work together.


You could automate time tracking for hourly employees by using an application that tracks employee hours. Payroll software could be used to handle direct deposits and taxes. The integration of the two processes will eliminate the need to manually enter employee hours.


Outsourcing is the act of transferring a business process from one company to another. You could, for example, hire another company to manage accounting and human resource management. Many business owners are reluctant to hire another company for accounting and human resources.


Woo suggests that outsourcing experts be considered if you are stuck managing existing processes. It’s a good investment because it will allow you to make better use of your time.


Make sure your team buys into outsourcing before you do. Be clear about the benefits and what your team can gain from outsourcing. To protect your data, it is important to perform a risk assessment. This is especially true if you are going to share customer or personal information.


About Allen Woo 


Allen Woo is a self-taught expert in business and personnel management. Originally from Canada, he has spent much of his adult life honing his innate skills in motivation and personal growth. Woo dedicates his time to helping businesses and individuals make significant improvements in their daily interactions, constantly exploring new methods to motivate and enhance teams. When he’s away from responsibilities, he likes to focus on inner growth and enjoys outdoor activities that exercise the body and the mind.

Allen Woo explains the differences between leading and managing

Many people tend to confuse the terms management and leadership, and Allen Woo clarifies the picture and explains the main differences between the two.

Québec, Canada – WEBWIRE

However, it is important to know that both are necessary for an organization. As we will see, if an organization is running efficiently, leadership and management exist in tandem.



Today, management and leadership are used interchangeably. However, even when they pursue similar objectives, they are radically different. Allen Woo, a connoisseur of all things related to personnel management and business, explains the main differences between leadership and management. 


Managers are often described as someone who tells people what they should do. Leaders inspire others through their words and actions, but without dictating. “These role portrayals, while semi-accurate, lead us to believe that we are naturally better off being called leaders than managers,” Woo explains. “However, it is important to know that both are necessary for an organization. As we will see, if an organization is running efficiently, leadership and management exist in tandem.”


Leadership and management are necessary competencies that add institutional value. Neither is superior or inferior to the other; they are simply different.


Leadership is about helping and inspiring people to achieve extraordinary results, to generate capabilities for excellence. Leadership is an activity of guiding and directing people to work together to achieve objectives. It requires a good vision and thinking outside the box.


“Leadership is not about titles, seniority, status, or management,” Woo points out. “A leader is someone who makes certain offers, requests, and promises. A leader generates an interpretation of the present, declares the possibility of a different future, and is able to generate trust in other people.”


The authority of the leader is given by the community being led. To be a leader, it is not enough to make a statement. The leader develops from his or her personal commitment to the mission and his or her competence to hold people together. Leadership will become evident when people give the leader the authority to lead the team toward mission success.


Leaders embody leadership mindsets, actions and are different. Leaders are defined by who they are as individuals and how they are perceived by their environment. You are not automatically a leader if you do leadership actions or hold a leadership position.


Management is the process of managing. As a manager, you are responsible for the operation and administration of the company and its workforce. This role ensures that the infrastructure for operations runs smoothly and that everything is exactly where it should be, when it should be, and that work is documented where necessary.


Managers are people who plan, organize and coordinate. They are methodical and always evaluate their process to make sure they are progressing as planned. If not, they adjust to going back to their baseline assessment.


Management is essential to ensure that an organization understands what they need to do and sets clear goals to achieve those objectives. This could be anything, from improving customer feedback to increasing profit margins.


Managers are also responsible for the top-down perspective of companies. Managers are often the eyes and ears for the business, and their influence is felt across the entire company. They work behind-the scenes to make sure that everything runs smoothly.


As you may have gathered, management and leadership overlap. Managers can certainly lead and leaders, in turn, can manage. However, the skills required to be good at either are different. The difference lies in how the two address similar challenges.


“Leadership requires vision, management requires tenacity,” Woo asserts. “A leader must develop a narrative, envision what the company will become, and state a mission. A good manager must be able to take that vision and transform it into reality using the resources that already exist in the company.”


Leadership inspires change; management manages transformation. A leader must set direction and inspire people to follow it. This process of following them often requires a lot of change, and this is where sound management comes in. It is the manager’s job to oversee the work required to implement the necessary changes and realize the organizational transformation set by leadership.


Leadership is more about inspiration, change, motivation, setting purpose and direction, as well as developing enthusiasm, unity and’stay power’ to see the journey through. Management is not about changing, but about stability and making the most of your resources to accomplish your goals.


Management and leadership are not two distinct things. They are often done by the same people. This is not the case of “You are either a manager, or a leader.”


Today it has been proven that it is critical for every organization to be a space for leadership. Every company requires leaders, people who have responsibility for declaring what game the organization will play and defining the roles of individuals within it. 


An organization cannot survive without its own reading of the world, without a declared mission, without making alliances and seducing people to unite and work under a common commitment and background. This leadership space can occur with varying degrees of effectiveness and success. However, an organization always requires leadership.


About Allen Woo 


Allen Woo is a self-taught expert in business and personnel management. Originally from Canada, he has spent much of his adult life honing his innate skills in motivation and personal growth. Woo dedicates his time to helping businesses and individuals make significant improvements in their daily interactions, constantly exploring new methods to motivate and enhance teams. When he’s away from responsibilities, he likes to focus on inner growth and enjoys outdoor activities that exercise the body and the mind.

Allen Woo discusses how to motivate teams to work together

Allen Woo explains how to properly motivate teams to ensure they work together toward the common goal of a project or the company.

Québec, Canada – WEBWIRE

In this way, the team will be enriched and the members will complement each other to function properly, always delivering the best results and best meeting the previously defined objectives.



The performance of a team will be good if the team achieves the results for which it was created and designed. Broadly speaking, there are four main variables that any team must consider. Objectives to be achieved, tasks to be carried out, functions to be performed and roles to be played. For the team to perform there must be a total alignment between these four variables. These variables are managed by people, so their attitude towards them will be fundamental. Based on this and on his experience as a group manager, Allen Woo provides some keys for teams to work together more adequately. 


As is well known, the relationship between people is not easy and does not respond to rational criteria. Among other important aspects (motivation, level of training, etc.), much depends on the personality of each one of them. A good work climate has been proven to have a positive impact on results.


As different tasks, functions, and roles often require different personalities, it is necessary in many cases to have people with different ways of looking at life and approaching their work. If we want everyone to be able to give the best of themselves, we have to be willing to make different demands on each person and to live with different personalities. We then enter a phase of comparisons. In many organizations, there is a tendency not to want to compare because the differences do not coexist very well with each other.


“If we want to get the best out of each person, we have to ensure that each person does what he or she does best so that the possible shortcomings of each person are counterbalanced by the strengths of another member of the team,” suggests Woo. “In this way, the team will be enriched and the members will complement each other to function properly, always delivering the best results and best meeting the previously defined objectives.”


This variety makes the team richer and more powerful. Of course, the person in charge has to dedicate time and effort to his or her people. Woo has taken on the task of discussing the essential points for a group made up of different people to be a high-performance team.


“For technical environments in small companies where there are no sophisticated people management systems, it is very useful to rely on DISC (Dominance, Influence, Steadiness, Compliance) systems that help us to perfectly define the different personality profiles according to their work orientations,” explains Woo.


From the management of the four variables mentioned above, there are six major processes that must be controlled for the success of the teams. The first is based on having defined, agreed, and measured objectives. 


Team members must know what tasks correspond to them and what their objectives are so that they can focus their time and effort on achieving success and the results set. It is important to measure and analyze the actions of the group, to know if the actions that are being carried out and the decisions that are taken are the right ones to achieve the objective.


The second point focuses on clarity in the definition of roles. “Even though the work is a team effort, each member must assume a specific role within the team,” says Woo. “All members must be clear about the objective so that they can work in the same direction. Also, defining roles will curb friction between members.”


Next comes defining the process correctly. The clarity in the process makes people know the path to success, which means faster learning and less resistance to change. A person who knows the process is a more productive person. The next process is good communication and a good climate. 


A fast and agile exchange of communication facilitates making the right decisions. This communication is important both among employees, with management, and even externally. We must define “how we are going to communicate,” states Woo. 


The fifth process is to have high levels of respect and trust. Members must help and support each other. It is important to reward individual and group progress by verbally expressing satisfaction with teamwork: “We are doing an excellent job”; “The results are better than expected”; “Let’s keep working in the same direction.


And finally, there is the importance of everyone’s participation. High performance and productivity are only achieved when commitment is individual, but team members have a global vision. The feeling of belonging to a team, of being valued, and of striving together for a goal, make workers motivated, will make them work happier and, therefore, more efficiently.


About Allen Woo


Allen Woo is a self-taught expert in business and personnel management. Originally from Canada, he has spent much of his adult life honing his innate skills in motivation and personal growth. Woo dedicates his time to helping businesses and individuals make significant improvements in their daily interactions, constantly exploring new methods to motivate and enhance teams. When he’s away from responsibilities, he likes to focus on inner growth and enjoys outdoor activities that exercise the body and the mind.

Allen Woo explains how to generate commitment in the employees of an organization

People developer Allen Woo provides insight into how businesses can motivate employees to keep them committed to objectives.

Québec, Canada – WEBWIRE

Most great things in this world are achieved through perseverance, hard work, and dedication. All of these qualities will not magically appear. A person develops these qualities over years, and the same is seen in companies. If you expect your employees to perform exceptionally well, then they will need to provide an environment that helps increase engagement.



To achieve their goals, organizations are especially dependent on their workforce. That’s why they must take the time to learn how to engage employees and understand what influences their performance. Allen Woo, an expert in people development and business, explains how these communities can gain the commitment needed to run an ideal organization. 


Employee commitment is defined as the level of enthusiasm workers have for their assigned tasks and accountability to the goals, vision, and mission of the organization with which it is associated. High levels of satisfaction in an organization are related to employee engagement. This translates into superior business performance, which means increased profitability, productivity, retention, and an overall improvement in the work environment.  


“That’s the level of work commitment that any organization would expect from its workforce,” says Woo. “Most great things in this world are achieved through perseverance, hard work, and dedication. All of these qualities will not magically appear. A person develops these qualities over years, and the same is seen in companies. If you expect your employees to perform exceptionally well, then they will need to provide an environment that helps increase engagement.”


Generating employee commitment brings too many benefits for organizations. A clear example of this is increased productivity, achieving objectives more efficiently. It can bring “fun” to work and has significant added value. Engagement at work brings value through active participation in company-related discussions. Engaged employees have great ideas and are always happy to help others visualize them. An organization needs the commitment and dedication of its employees to achieve its goals.


Increasing employee commitment is not going to happen in a single day. It takes time to achieve employee satisfaction and that is why Woo shares some tips on how to generate employee engagement. 


The first is to build a strong team. Organizations must build a culture where teamwork should be important. Achieving goals together makes difficult tasks seem easy to accomplish. Teamwork depends on employees’ ability to interact with each other and how well they perform as a group. An organization can tell if teamwork is the answer to problems. Online surveys are a great tool to record all responses that can then be evaluated and analyzed.


It is also of utmost importance to communicate to employees what is expected of them. Hardworking employees are an asset to an organization. Most want to be part of a success story. The fact that they know what the organization expects of them generates commitment to the job and the pursuit of excellence.


“Promoting transparency is another tip for learning how to engage the employees who are most important to the organization,” Woo says. “Let employees participate freely in discussions, workforce decisions, and anything else they can contribute to. If you keep them informed, they feel valued and trustworthy. This increases their sense of belonging and also their commitment to the job.”


The next tip to generate employee commitment is open and free communication, as this facilitates a trusting environment. Open door policy is one of the ways to promote free communication. 


Alternatively, an organization can use employee engagement surveys, polls, etc., where they can provide feedback to the organization. In receiving this feedback, organizations need to keep an open mind to understand where they are not achieving employee expectations and how they can improve the work culture. Once they know that their suggestions or feedback are valued, there will be an increase in commitment.


Work ethic not only includes how an employee feels about their job or career, but it also demonstrates who and how they are, as well as how seriously they take their job responsibilities. It involves attitude, behavior, respect for co-workers, effective communication, and interaction in the workplace. 


“Employee retention is a real issue; however, if organizations can make employees feel valued, it will lead to greater engagement at work. But without motivated and engaged people, you can be in a position of risk,” notes Woo.


Generating employee engagement leads to higher productivity. Having employees who are not engaged in what they do in an organization is catastrophic. These employees tend to use their time at work to surf the Internet for personal pleasure or even to look for other job opportunities. This is a waste of time and resources. 


A team of employees who are committed to the job is the best thing for the long-term future of any business. That is why leaders within the organization are responsible for building that culture. 


About Allen Woo 


Allen Woo is a self-taught expert in business and personnel management. Originally from Canada, he has spent much of his adult life honing his innate skills in motivation and personal growth. Woo dedicates his time to helping businesses and individuals make significant improvements in their daily interactions, constantly exploring new methods to motivate and enhance teams. When he’s away from responsibilities, he likes to focus on inner growth and enjoys outdoor activities that exercise the body and the mind.