Canada – Canada and British Columbia invest in upgrades to the water filtration system for the Greater Vernon community

Vernon, British Columbia, August 12, 2021—The governments of Canada and British Columbia continue to invest in local infrastructure during this unprecedented time to meet the needs of communities across the province, enhance people’s quality of life, and support economic recovery from COVID-19.

Vernon, British Columbia, August 12, 2021—The governments of Canada and British Columbia continue to invest in local infrastructure during this unprecedented time to meet the needs of communities across the province, enhance people’s quality of life, and support economic recovery from COVID-19.

Today, the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Harwinder Sandhu, the Member of British Columbia’s Legislative Assembly for Vernon-Monashee, on behalf of the Honourable Josie Osborne, Minister of Municipal Affairs, announced funding to upgrade the water filtration system for the Greater Vernon area.

The project will see the construction of a new water filtration facility at the Mission Hill water treatment plant. This facility will help improve water quality and increase access to clean drinking water in the community. The project includes a new water filtration system, a new building for labs and control rooms, upgrades to waste-stream handling, related piping and equipment, and, electrical, mechanical and control systems.

The Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia are investing close to $30 million in this project through the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program’s Green Infrastructure Stream. Canada is contributing more than $16.3 million, B.C.’s contribution is more than $13.6 million, and the Regional District of North Okanagan is investing over $10.9 million. Federal and provincial funding is conditional on fulfilling all requirements related to consultation with Indigenous groups and environmental assessment requirements

“Today’s announcement of over $16.3 million from the federal government will support the Greater Vernon Area’s goals to upgrade its water filtration system and provide reliable services to local residents. In partnership with B.C., we continue to invest in critical infrastructure, building greener, healthier and more resilient communities, and supporting local economies at a time when it is needed most. Canada’s infrastructure plan invests in thousands of projects, creates jobs across the country, and builds cleaner, more inclusive communities.”

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

“Clean drinking water is one of the most important priorities for any community. I’m glad to see all levels of government working together to ensure that the Greater Vernon Area will have access to clean water and be able to limit boil water advisories, supporting people’s health and wellbeing.”

Harwinder, Sandhu, Member of British Columbia’s Legislative Assembly for Vernon-Monashee, on behalf of the Honourable Josie Osborne, Minister of Municipal Affairs

“We are extremely thankful for this support. This filtration plant is especially crucial in light of the major challenges facing our water supply. We have already seen climate change impacts, such as the high algae levels in the fall of 2020 and the increasing frequency of floods that bring sediment plumes to our intake. The Boil Water Notice from the historic 2017 flood resulted in economic losses of over $2 million, just in terms of the drinking water needs of our residents and businesses, on top of the major health risk to our most vulnerable citizens. There are many factors beyond our control that make filtration a necessity for safe drinking water.”

Kevin Acton, Chair of the Regional District of North Okanagan Board of Directors

Emelyana Titarenko

Press Secretary

Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

873-355-9576

Emelyana.Titarenko@infc.gc.ca

Lauren Mulholland

Media Relations

B.C. Ministry of Municipal Affairs

250-208-0410

Lauren.Mulholland@gov.bc.ca

Canada – Canada and British Columbia invest to revitalize Lions Bay Beach Park

Today, Patrick Weiler, Member of Parliament for West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Josie Osborne, British Columbia’s Minister of Municipal Affairs, and Ron McLaughlin, Mayor, Village of Lions Bay, announced funding to revitalize the Lions Bay Beach Park, an important part of the community’s recreation infrastructure.

Lions Bay, British Columbia, August 12, 2021—The governments of Canada and British Columbia continue to invest in local infrastructure during this unprecedented time to meet the needs of communities, enhance peoples’ quality of life, and support economic recovery from COVID-19. 

Today, Patrick Weiler, Member of Parliament for West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Josie Osborne, British Columbia’s Minister of Municipal Affairs, and Ron McLaughlin, Mayor, Village of Lions Bay, announced funding to revitalize the Lions Bay Beach Park, an important part of the community’s recreation infrastructure.

The Lions Bay Beach Park revitalization will replace a number of structures to improve accessibility and the quality of community infrastructure. The washroom bunker will be replaced with a new facility; playground structures will be installed; and a new boat storage rack and rehabilitated jetty will be added for public enjoyment of recreational water activities. The project also includes new accessible pathways to the beach and covered picnic areas. Upgrading the park facilities will provide a modern and inclusive outdoor space for the community.

The Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia are investing over $784,000 in this project through the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program’s Community, Culture, and Recreation Infrastructure Stream. Canada is contributing $428,175, British Columbia is contributing $356,777, and the Village of Lions Bay is contributing $285,486. 

“Public recreation facilities are essential to provide safe, accessible, and enjoyable spaces that allow our communities to be healthy and liveable. This project will revitalize the Lions Bay Beach Park’s facilities to improve accessibility, and allow residents and visitors of all ages and abilities to enjoy a more inclusive outdoor space. Through collaboration with our provincial and municipal partners, we are upgrading our communities’ most cherished recreational infrastructure to build a cleaner, more resilient, and inclusive British Columbia.”

Patrick Weiler, Member of Parliament for West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

“Revitalizing the Lions Bay Beach park will open up the beach area for kids to play safely and for families and individuals to access amenities and fully enjoy the beautiful outdoors in Lions Bay for generations to come. Together with the federal government, we are investing in infrastructure that helps improve people’s health and well-being, promotes active lifestyles and connects people and communities through culture and recreation.”

Josie Osborne, British Columbia’s Minister of Municipal Affairs

“The Lions Bay Beach Park is the principle outdoor recreation facility and gathering place for the entire community and enhances the attractiveness of Lions Bay as a community for current and potential residents and businesses. The revitalized park will improve accessibility of community amenities and recreational opportunities for both residents and visitors from throughout the region.”

Ron McLaughlin, Mayor, Village of Lions Bay

Emelyana Titarenko

Press Secretary

Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

873-355-9576

Emelyana.Titarenko@infc.gc.ca

Lauren Mulholland

Media Relations

B.C. Ministry of Municipal Affairs

250-208-0410

Lauren.Mulholland@gov.bc.ca                                                                                

Karla Duarte

Municipal Coordinator

Village of Lions Bay

604-932-9333, Ext.3

office@lionsbay.ca

Canada – Canada and British Columbia invest to expand and update the Spani Outdoor Pool Complex in Central Coquitlam, B.C.

Today, Ron McKinnon, Member of Parliament for Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Teri Towner, Acting Mayor of Coquitlam, , announced funding to expand and update the Spani Outdoor Pool complex in Central Coquitlam, an important part of the community’s recreation infrastructure.

Coquitlam, British Columbia, August 13, 2021—The governments of Canada and British Columbia continue to invest in local infrastructure during this unprecedented time to meet the needs of communities across the province, enhance people’s quality of life, and support economic recovery from COVID-19.   

Today, Ron McKinnon, Member of Parliament for Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Teri Towner, Acting Mayor of Coquitlam, , announced funding to expand and update the Spani Outdoor Pool complex in Central Coquitlam, an important part of the community’s recreation infrastructure.

The Spani Outdoor Pool renewal project will construct a leisure pool with accessible beach entry, add a changeroom and washroom facility, and upgrade the plumbing as well as mechanical and electrical systems. The project works also include shade structure and seating, open space for social gathering, and improvements to existing pedestrian and vehicle pathways to improve accessibility. Upgrading the pool facility will provide the City of Coquitlam with an accessible, modern, inclusive outdoor space, and expands the community’s recreation opportunities and aquatic services.

Through the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program’s (ICIP) Community, Culture, and Recreation Infrastructure Stream, the Government of Canada is investing over $2.41 million in this project. The Province of British Columbia is funding over $2.01 million. The City of Coquitlam is contributing over $8 million, including $1.6M towards costs considered eligible under the ICIP funding program.

“Spani Outdoor Pool has been a popular recreation site for Coquitlam for 50 years, and this project will allow residents and visitors to enjoy it for many years to come. The new facility will benefit the entire community, giving people of all ages and different mobility a place to have fun, exercise, and develop an important life skill. Canada’s Infrastructure plan invests in thousands of projects, creates jobs across Canada, and builds stronger communities.”

Ron McKinnon, Member of Parliament for Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, on behalf of the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

“Locally-led recreation and programming is one of the best, most affordable ways for everyone in the community to have access to physical fitness and family activities. The Spani Outdoor Pool has been a hub of activity and leisure for Coquitlam families for 50 years. By renewing this popular recreation centre with a new leisure pool, family-friendly beach entry and accessible facilities, we are ensuring the pool continues to serve the people of Coquitlam for years to come.”

Selina Robinson, MLA for Coquitlam-Maillardville and British Columbia’s Minister of Finance

“Spani Pool has been a part of the Coquitlam community for over fifty years. For generations, it has offered a place for everyone from children to seniors, and competitive swimmers to recreational visitors, to stay active and enjoy the natural outdoor setting surrounding the pool. We thank our federal and provincial partners for their contributions to the renewal project. This funding allows Coquitlam to reduce the financial burden on taxpayers while ensuring this important community asset is upgraded to offer improved accessibility and features that will better serve citizens for many years to come.”

Teri Towner, Acting Mayor, City of Coquitlam

Emelyana Titarenko

Press Secretary

Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

873-355-9576

Emelyana.Titarenko@infc.gc.ca

Lauren Mulholland

Media Relations

B.C. Ministry of Municipal Affairs

250-208-0410

Lauren.Mulholland@gov.bc.ca

Canada – Canada and British Columbia support Tseshaht First Nation to locate and commemorate their missing children from former residential schools

The location and confirmation of unmarked graves of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children at former residential school sites across Canada are tragic reminders of the mistreatment of Indigenous children. As part of efforts to address historical wrongs and the lasting physical, emotional, mental and spiritual harms, the Government of Canada and Government of British Columbia are supporting Tseshaht First Nation as they embark on the difficult work of honouring the missing children who attended the Alberni Indian Resident School.

Taking care: We recognize that this statement comes at a time that is difficult for many and that our efforts to honour victims and families may act as an unwelcome reminder to those who have suffered hardships through generations of government policies that were harmful to Indigenous Peoples. A support line is available to former residential school students and their families for support, emotional and crisis referral services. You can also find information on how to obtain other health supports from the Government of Canada.

Please call the Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419 if you or someone you know is triggered while reading this.

We encourage all those who need some support at this time to reach out and know that support is always there for you through the Hope for Wellness Help Line at 1-855-242-3310 (toll-free) or the online chat at hopeforwellness.ca, open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

August 13, 2021 — Tseshaht First Nation, Port Alberni, British Columbia — Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

The location and confirmation of unmarked graves of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children at former residential school sites across Canada are tragic reminders of the mistreatment of Indigenous children. As part of efforts to address historical wrongs and the lasting physical, emotional, mental and spiritual harms, the Government of Canada and Government of British Columbia are supporting Tseshaht First Nation as they embark on the difficult work of honouring the missing children who attended the Alberni Indian Resident School.

Today, Elected Chief Ken Watts of the Tseshaht First Nation, the Honourable Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, and the Honourable Murray Rankin, British Columbia Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, announced funding of $1.028 million for the Tseshaht First Nation to work with Survivors, intergenerational Survivors, knowledge keepers and leaders to address the location, documentation, maintenance and commemoration of burial sites associated with the Alberni Indian Residential School, and to provide wrap-around mental health and wellness supports to community members.

This community-led process will ensure Tseshaht First Nation can undertake this work in their own way and at their own pace.

The Government of Canada will provide funding of up to $550,000 over two years (2021-2022 and 2022-2023) for the project. The Province of British Columbia will provide $475,000 over two years (2021-2022 and 2022-2023).

During this summer of reflection, Canadians are absorbing the realities of the horrors of residential schools and the missing children and unmarked burial sites at across the country and the damaging legacy and intergenerational trauma that persists today.

Addressing the harms suffered by Survivors, their families and communities is at the heart of reconciliation. This work is essential as we renew and rebuild our relationships between all Indigenous Peoples, their families and communities, governments, and all Canadians.

“We are here to support Tseshaht First Nation and their community as they do this important and difficult work. Canadians now recognize the tragic legacy of residential schools – what it must have felt like to have your children taken away from you against your will and some  never to return home. The hearts of Canadians are with the Tseshaht  First Nation in the search for their missing children and their healing journey”

The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, M.D., P.C., M.P.


Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

“We commend the leadership of Tseshaht First Nation as they embark on the difficult work of honouring the children who never came home. Their efforts, as well as those of other caretaker communities, are helping to reveal the full extent of the atrocities of the Indian Residential School system. This funding supports one more step toward truth, healing, and justice for survivors and their families.”

The Honourable Murray Rankin

British Columbia Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

“Tseshaht First Nation, like all First Nations across the country, continue to feel the impacts of residential schools and the resurfaced trauma over the last few months with the growing number of confirmed unmarked graves of children at former residential school sites. Like Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc, Tseshaht had a residential school placed within our traditional territory without our consent. The Alberni Indian Residential school (AIRS) was in operation in Tseshaht territory from 1900-1973. We recognize the far reaching and generational impacts this has had on our own Nation and the Nations whose children were forcibly placed in the Alberni Indian Residential School.

Tseshaht Council, Hawiih (hereditary chiefs) and community are committed to working with survivors to ensure that the investigation that we are embarking on proceeds in a manner that is grounded in culture protocols and honours the voices of survivors and those who never made it home.

Tseshaht has called on the Federal government and churches to address the harms caused by placing this institution in our community. Today we acknowledge the funding commitments from both the Federal and Provincial governments to begin the important work that is necessary to take another step toward healing for our community and all those impacted by AIRS. This initial step toward reconciliation marks an important time in history. Government, churches, Indigenous leaders and society, collectively have a responsibility to create a better future for our children and generations to come – a future where every child genuinely knows that they matter.”

Chief Ken Watts

Tseshaht First Nation

Ani Dergalstanian

Press Secretary and Communications Advisor

Office of the Honourable Carolyn Bennett

Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

819-997-0002

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Canada – Governments of Canada, British Columbia, Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’xais, Nuxalk, and Wuikinuxv working together to protect Central Coast of British Columbia  

Memorandum of Understanding signed to launch a feasibility assessment for a proposed National Marine Conservation Area Reserve in British Columbia’s Central Coast..

Memorandum of Understanding signed to launch a feasibility assessment for a proposed National Marine Conservation Area Reserve in British Columbia’s Central Coast.

August 13, 2021              Central Coast, British Columbia                   Parks Canada

Protected areas play a vital role in conserving natural and cultural marine heritage, fighting climate change and biodiversity loss, and providing Canadians with opportunities to learn more about iconic cultural and natural settings.

Today, Marilyn Slett, Chief, Heiltsuk Nation; Doug Neasloss, Chief, Kitasoo/Xai’xais Nation; Samuel Schooner, Chief, Nuxalk Nation; Danielle Shaw, Chief, Wuikinuxv Nation, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada; the Honourable Katrine Conroy, B.C. Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development; and the Honourable George Heyman, B.C. Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding to launch a feasibility assessment for a national marine conservation area reserve (NMCAR) in the Central Coast area of British Columbia.

The study area for the national marine conservation area reserve feasibility assessment is about 14,200 square kilometres in size, and located in the coastal and offshore marine waters adjacent to the Great Bear Rainforest on the Central Coast of British Columbia. The study area includes inshore and offshore marine ecosystems, that are adjacent to an intricate shoreline that includes steep walled fjords and narrow channels, island archipelagos, open coast, estuaries, sandy beaches, shell midden beaches, and rocky shorelines. This dynamic environment is home to numerous species of marine mammals, including humpback whales, orcas, sea lions, Harbour and Dall’s porpoises, more than 6000 species of invertebrates, 400 species of fish, 150 species of birds, and some of the largest kelp forests in British Columbia. It is also an important habitat for a number of endangered species including eulachon, abalone, bocaccio, marbled murrelet, and sea otters.  

For millennia, the wellbeing of the Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’Xais, Nuxalk and Wuikinuxv have been linked, inextricably, to the health of the marine environment. Management and use of abundant marine resources, particularly salmon, eulachon and herring, supported ancient civilizations and allowed rich and complex cultures and societies to develop. Archaeologists have dated the origins of village sites on the Central Coast to as far back as 14,000 years – making them some of the oldest continually occupied sites in Canada. Pre-contact, the Central Coast supported some of the highest population concentrations in North America.

Today, community members of the Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’Xais, Nuxalk and Wuikinuxv continue to honour their responsibility as caretakers of the marine environment. The life blood of the Nations’ communities comes from the existence of a network of diverse and healthy species, populations, and areas. Maintaining and restoring marine ecosystems will support not just Nations’ physical health but is inextricably connected to cultural health and continuity.

The feasibility assessment, led by Central Coast Nations, Parks Canada, and the Government of British Columbia, will use western science, Indigenous knowledge, and the results of consultations with stakeholders including the fishing industry, non-government organizations, and Canadians to consider the social, cultural, environmental, and ecosystem benefits and impacts of establishing a national marine conservation area reserve in the Central Coast of British Columbia. The results of the feasibility assessment will inform future decisions about whether the proposal will continue, including a proposed boundary and zoning considerations.

Grounded by science, Indigenous knowledge and local perspectives, Canada is committed to conserving 25 percent of marine and coastal areas by 2025, working toward 30 percent by 2030. Budget 2021 provided $976.8 million over five years for the establishment and management of new marine protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures, working with provincial, territorial, and Indigenous governments, and stakeholders.

Based on a model of collaborative governance and management, the enhanced protection of this Central Coast marine ecosystem stemming from a proposed national marine conservation area reserve would help to conserve biodiversity, manage fisheries sustainably, and mitigate the impacts of climate change. Furthermore, it would contribute to maintaining the culture, traditions, economies, and well-being of the Central Coast First Nations, who have long been stewards of these lands and waters.

A national marine conservation area reserve in the Central Coast is considered to be an important element of the marine protected area network being planned for the Pacific Region’s Northern Shelf Bioregion. Parks Canada, BC, and the Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’xais, Nuxalk, and Wuikinuxv Nations are partners in the development of this planned network approach for marine conservation in the Northern Shelf Bioregion.  Consultation on this broader network process is anticipated later in 2021 with the goal of completing the Network Action Plan by June 2022. Input from consultations will provide important feedback for consideration in the Central Coast National Marine Conservation Area Reserve feasibility assessment process.

                                                                                                -30-

“British Columbia’s Central Coast is teeming with life and history. From countless marine species to the rich cultures and histories of First Nation communities, this area is remarkable. I am proud that the Government of Canada is taking an important step today, with the Government of British Columbia, the Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’xais, Nuxalk Nation, and Wuikinuxv Nation, to protect this treasured place. On top of helping to conserve biodiversity and cultural marine heritage, protecting marine areas also plays a critical role in mitigating the impacts of climate change. Through science, Indigenous knowledge, and local perspectives, we will meet our commitment to conserving 25 percent of marine and coastal areas by 2025, and 30 percent by 2030.”

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson

Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

“Our coastal waters are home to an amazing variety of animal and plant life, and it is so important that we work with our Federal and First Nations partners to explore the protection of this area. This agreement will allow us to pursue the conservation of an important ecological area for future generations, as well as protect the habitat of the numerous wildlife that call it home.”

The Honourable Katrine Conroy

B.C. Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development

“The unique marine environment of British Columbia’s Central Coast is home to rich, unique, spectacular and at-risk biodiversity that has deep historic and cultural significance to Indigenous peoples. All British Columbians care about our coast — it’s a part of our identity —  and know we need to protect its health. It’s vital that all levels of government come together to preserve this area’s irreplaceable marine environment, for now and for the future.”

The Honourable George Heyman

B.C. Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy

“The Heiltsuk Nation support this collaborative NMCAR feasibility assessment, we look forward to working towards co- developing an approach and process that is complimentary to our Gvi’ilas. Our Gvi’ilas, the laws of our ancestors as the paramount principle to guide all resource use and environmental management. Gvi’ilas refers to our “power” or authority over all matters that affect our lives. It is a complex and comprehensive system of laws that embodies values, beliefs, teachings, principles, practices, and consequences. Inherent in this is the understanding that all things are connected and that unity is important to maintain.”

Chief Marilyn Slett

Heiltsuk Nation

“The protection and sustainability of our marine environment is a priority for the Kitasoo/Xai’xais Nation. With today’s announcement and signing of the Memorandum of Understanding, we look forward to collaborating with Canada and British Columbia on the feasibility assessment for a national marine conservation area reserve, and learning how best to protect the marine environment and the ecological, social, cultural and economic values that it sustains.”

Chief Doug Neasloss

Kitasoo/Xai’xais Nation

“Today’s announcement is an important milestone in reconciliation, co-management, and ecosystem protection on the Central Coast. Nuxalkmc have relied on the rich marine resources in our traditional territories for thousands of years, and as a Nation we are committed to protecting this important region for our future generations. The national marine conservation area reserve feasibility assessment has the potential to help conserve our shared resources and demonstrate true collaborative governance with Indigenous peoples.”

Chief Samuel Schooner

Nuxalk Nation

“True reconciliation requires strong collaboration and consistent relationship building. Guided by the principle of ńàńakila (to protect and/or keep an eye on) the Wuikinuxv Nation hopes to achieve a balanced approach to marine conservation in important areas and marine habitats along our coast. We believe that the tools provided within the National Marine Conservation Area Reserve framework can help to reach these objectives and allow for joint decision making. It is with these sentiments in mind that we sign this Memorandum of Understanding.”

Chief Danielle Shaw

Wuikinuxv Nation

A significant number of spiritually and culturally important areas occur within the study area including petroglyphs, pictoglyphs, burial boxes, village sites, totems, and other areas important for the culture and well-being of local first nations such as harvesting, educational and spiritual sites. 

The Central Coast is an important area for marine science and education, as demonstrated by the Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance, Coastal Guardian Watchman, Supporting Emerging Aboriginal Stewards Initiative,  Hakai Institute and the Qqs camp. 

National marine conservation areas are managed and used in a sustainable manner that meets the needs of present and future generations without compromising ecological sustainability. The establishment of a national marine conservation area reserve in Central Coast would support many sustainable community fisheries which are vital to the local economy. Commercial fishing, except for bottom trawling, is permitted within NMCAs within zones that permit ecologically sustainable use.  

BC Parks and local First Nations manage dozens of coastal marine protected areas within the study area. 

Parks Canada is responsible for protecting nationally significant places of Canada’s natural heritage and sharing their stories, including the history, cultures, and contributions of Indigenous peoples, with Canadians and the world. The Agency protects a vast network of cultural and natural heritage places that include five national marine conservation areas, 171 national historic sites, 47 national parks, and one national urban park.

Parks Canada administered national marine conservation areas and coastal national parks currently contribute 2.12 percent of Canada’s 13.81 percent total marine and coastal protected areas.

Under Budget 2021, the Government of Canada has made a historic investment to protect the health of our oceans, including $976.8 million in funding over five years to reach ambitious marine conservation targets through the establishment of marine protected areas (including National Marine Conservation Areas) and other effective area-based conservation measures, such as marine refuges.

Budget 2021 also made a historic investment of $2.3 billion over five years in Canada’s Nature Legacy to address the biodiversity crisis, protect and conserve nature, and create jobs in nature conservation and management.

Joanna Sivasankaran

Press Secretary      

Office of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change

819-790-1907

Joanna.sivasankaran@ec.gc.ca

Media Relations

Operations and Rural Development

Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource

250-356-7506