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Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors have many years of experience in probate law and can advise potential clients on a number of issues, including wills.

[PORTSMOUTH, 8/1/2018] – Making a will is considered a dark exercise by many people, but they are really important because they reflect the wishes of the deceased and protect the estate from various contenders. Here are some common questions about them and how Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors can help.

Why is it important to make a will?

While this goes without saying, a will drafted with the help of Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors can save the deceased’s family and relatives from a lot of trouble after their death. For starters, a will drafted with the assistance of Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors will explicitly state the beneficiaries of the estate. If underage children are part of the family, then a will created with the help of Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors will also include provisions for their education, well-being and other aspects of their life.

More importantly, a person can clearly state in their will who they do not want to receive any part of their asset after death. If this person is a close relative and a will was not present, then chances are that part of the estate would end up to them. Last but not least, a carefully-crafted will by Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors will ensure that an executor will sort out any problems or conflicts that may arise among the deceased’s family and friends. Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors can act as executors of a potential client’s will.

Does a will need to be changed after a divorce or civil dissolution?

The law states that any gift or reference to a former partner is in effect deleted after a divorce or civil dissolution and any mention to the union ceases does not stand legally. Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors will ensure that this is followed, though a new will can also be designed.

Does a will have to be drafted by Andrew & Andrew probate solicitors?

Wills can be drafted without a solicitor. However, people who are want to make sure their will is valid are strongly encouraged to consult one.